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Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth
Written by John de St. Jorre

312 pages, 9-1/2 x 12-1/2, with over 258 full-color photographs

ISBN: 0-9658904-4

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Legendary Golf Clubs of The American EAST


 

In the ever-expanding world of golf , certain clubs and courses have achieved iconic status. Their names conjure up the long history of American golf: dynamic founders, great sculptors of the land, extraordinary golfers achieving heroic feats in breathtaking competition. Shinnecock Hills, Oakmont, The Country Club, Seminole, Newport, Pine Valley, Merion, The National. Their image may be international, but their character is intensely private. Other clubs are less familiar: Myopia, Ekwanok, Somerset Hills, Yeamans Hall. These names evoke a different magic, one of mystery, a step back in time, perhaps a touch of eccentricity. Yet they, too, are part if the historical tapestry and they, too, are protective of their privacy.


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Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth

Written by John de St. Jorre

Foreward by Jack Nicklaus

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Legendary Golf Clubs of The American Midwest

Kansas City Country Club • Milwaukee Country Club • Old Elm Golf Club • Shoreacres • Country Club of Detroit • Prairie Dunes Country Club • The Camargo Club • Kirtland Country Club • St. Louis Country Club • Scioto Country Club • Woodhill Country Club • Interlachen Country Club


 

The Midwest has a rich history of golf clubs, classic golf courses, and epic battles on the fairways. Charles Blair Macdonald and his pioneering work in and around Chicago are well known. But he was not alone. There were many other enthusiastic golfers in major cities like St. Louis, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland, Minneapolis, Cincinnati, and Kansas City who created some of the region’s oldest and most respected clubs and built some of the country’s best golf courses. The clubs in this book bring together the great shapers of the earth during the golden age of golf course architecture.

Here you will see on display the artistry of Donald Ross, C.B. Macdonald, Seth Raynor, Harry Colt, Charles Alison, A.W.  Tillinghast, and Perry Maxwell.

The team of photographer Anthony Edgeworth and writer John de St. Jorre has already portrayed the iconic clubs of Britain (Legendary Golf Clubs of Scotland, England, Wales, and Ireland), of Ireland(Legendary Golf Links of Ireland), and of the eastern part of the United States (Legendary Golf Clubs of the American East). They now open the clubhouse doors and golf courses of twelve great clubs in the Midwest.

Anthony Edgeworth’s photographs evoke the past and present with lush, dramatic images of the landscape, the golf courses, the clubhouses, the members and staffs, and the historical artifacts of these private clubs. John de St. Jorre complements the visual array with profiles of each club, tracing its history, describing the evolution of the golf course, recalling great sporting moments and heroic players, and eliciting every club’s individual ethos through letting the members speak for themselves. And golf being golf, there is plenty of humor, eccentricity, and “characters.”

This sumptuous book invites you to sample the rolling sand hills of Prairie Dunes Country Club in the middle of pancake-flat Kansas; to see where Arnold Palmer won his career-launching victory at the Country Club of Detroit; to gaze down at the untrammeled beauty of the valley that cradles Kirtland Country Club’s back nine; to discover how Tom Watson learned his golf at Kansas City Country Club and meet the man who taught him; to walk the Donald Ross golf course at Interlachen where Bobby Jones won the third stage of his historic Grand Slam; and to track Jack Nicklaus’s formative years at Scioto Country Club.

It is entirely appropriate that America’s greatest golfer, a Midwesterner born and bred, should write the Foreword to this book.


A review by Michael M. Thomas

Once upon a time, a properly put together gentleperson’s library would include a short shelf of erotica placed where the prying eyes and hands of the children couldn’t get at them. These would be finely printed and bound volumes representing many cultures,  often splendidly, seductively illustrated, with titles like The Perfumed Garden and Memoirs of a Lady of Pleasure. Books to be savored alone or in very select company, delectations of forbidden pleasures to be enjoyed of an evening by the firelight with a fine old brandy or malt.

This sort of erotica has probably had its day, overrun in our time by internet porn the way Alaric and his Visigoths sacked the grandeur that was Rome. Whether gentlepersons’ libraries are still formed I can’t say. If they are, and in the expectation that anyone with the cultivation and moral self-assurance to appreciate great erotic books must perforce be a golfer, such a person’s bookshelves will contain a selection of choice works on the great Scots game, going forward from the Reverend John Kerr’s The Golf Book of East Lothian (1896) to a book I have just put down with that mixture of joy, admiration, mental fulfillment and melancholy known only to golfers condemned to their armchairs by the seasons of the year or the seasons of life. It is Legendary Golf Clubs of the American Midwest, with photographs by Anthony Edgeworth, text by his longtime collaborator, John de St. Jorre, and a forward by Jack Nicklaus, the man who bestrides Midwestern golf in much the same way the Statue of Liberty bestrides New York harbor.

Midwest, as I shall call it, is the fourth such volume produced by the Edgeworth-de St. Jorre team, and like its predecessors (which cover clubs in Great Britain, the Irish Republic and the American East), it is absolutely splendid and absolutely special. But note the title carefully, Gentle Reader: this is a book about golf clubs, and not simply golf courses. Its entrancements don’t end on the eighteenth green of famous names like Interlachen, outside Minneapolis, or Chicago’s Old Elm, or such hatcheries of sublime talent as Kansas City Golf Club, where a towhead named Tom Watson first picked up sticks or Scioto, outside Columbus, whose fairways helped hone the game of the young Jack Nicklaus. These are places, each with its own Gestalt, and Edgeworth and de St. Jorre give them to us holistically, and with a real grasp of what clubs are and how they work. To be sure, the great courses are here — it was at Interlachen in 1930 that Bob Jones won the U.S. Open, third leg in his Grand Slam — and these clubs have hosted a wide range of important competitions. Caviar names like Donald Ross and Francis Ouimet dot the pages, and readers with a keenness for local history will wriggle with delight, but at the end of the day and the book it is the wholeness of the whole that matters. Golf not only is, to paraphrase the poet, it means, and a grasp of what this meaning is, socially and otherwise, is as well provided in this book as any I can think of. Private golf clubs aren’t the entire story of American golf, perhaps not even the main story, but they are among the game’s mainstays of survival and lore, and need to be understood as such.   

I have said I read Midwest with a certain melancholy and I should explain myself. Another poet I relish wrote long ago: “I see the land of lost content/I see it shining plain/The happy highways where I went/And shall not go again.” Change those last two lines to “The happy fairways I never went/And will know only in vain” and you’ll appreciate my vexation. Save for a golf-cart tour of the amazing Prairie Dunes links at Hutchinson, KN some years ago, I’ve never played any of these courses, visited any of these clubs. It’s a sad hole in my golf education, and now, thanks to advanced age (and its corollary: tee shots that barely carry 170 yards, if that) I fear I never shall. But hold that thought: thanks to Legendary Golf Clubs of the American Midwest, I have been given a pretty good approximation of what it must feel like to play these great courses, and to hang out in these fine clubs, up to and including being treated to their special cocktails and entrees and a broad sampling of their Oldest Members’ choicest anecdotes. It really doesn’t get much better than this.

Thanks, Tony; thanks, John; thanks, Jack. Now – on to Texas!


Contact Edgeworth Editions by email: sales@edgewortheditions.com or Fax: 718-496-6490

 
 

 
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Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth
Written by John de St. Jorre

312 pages, 9-1/2 x 12-1/2, with over 258 full-color photographs

ISBN: 0-9658904-4

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Legendary Golf Clubs of The Ireland


The Portmarnock Golf Club • The Island Golf Club • County Louth Golf Club • Royal County Down • Royal Portrush Golf Club • Port Stewart Golf Club • Ballyliffin • Golf Club • Carne Golf Links • Enniscrone Golf Club • Donegal Golf Club • County • Sligo Golf Club • Lahinch Golf Club • Ballybunion Golf Club • Dooks Golf Links • Tralee Golf Club • Waterville Golf Links


 

Mistaken for the place where golf began, they have been called the “links of heaven” and the “greatest golf courses in the world.” For anyone who has played the magical links courses of Ireland, all that makes sense. Their qualities, British golf writer Henry Longhurst, decided, were a combination of course design, scenery and atmosphere — plus “that indefinable something which makes you relive again and again the day you played there.”

In our previous two books, Legendary Golf Clubs of Scotland England Wales & Ireland and Legendary Golf Clubs of the American East EdgeworthEditions has taken you on privileged insider's tours of the premier golf clubs of Britain and the eastern United States. Now you're invited to spend time with photographer Anthony Edgeworth and writer John de St. Jorre as they tour the dazzling links courses of the Emerald Isle, visiting the clubhouses, talking with members and capturing the surrounding countryside at locales like Ballybunion, Royal County Down, Portmarnock, Lahinch, Donnegal, Tralee, Waterville and Royal Portrush: names that evoke memories of blustering winds and sweeping strands. Ireland is enjoying a marvelous economic boom, and as a venue for golfers the island from the north to south has no match on earth.

"If I had to have one book on the courses of Ireland on my coffee table, this would be it. The photographs drew me into the pages and onto the grass - I can smell Ireland when I open it!  Anthony has captured the chilly mists and warm swaths of biblical light that illuminate the Irish countryside, which make you feel that even though your game may have gone to hell, you are still playing in heaven." David Feherty, contributor, Golf Magazine and GolfOnline, and CBS Sports broadcaster

The greatest—the best—golf books flow out of their authors' grphp of inclusiveness. It's what we get out of Darwin , out of Herb Wind, out of Wodehouse: the whole deal. I look at these images, read the text, and there comes a sense of the entirety of the experience of Irish golf, wherever played… I have no hesitation in declaring this book to be Edgeworth's and de St. Jorre's noblest effort yet, worthy of comparison in all significant artistic qualities with Bernard Darwin's and Harry Rountree's Golf Courses of the British Isles , published almost a century ago, and equally entitled as that classic to space in any golf library that claims to be serious. … Indispensable.” Michael Thomas, Travel & Leisure Golf Magazine

“It is a magnificent book, with superb photographs and a wonderful narrative, which combine so well to capture the essence of playing golf in Ireland .” Sir Michael Bonallack , former secretary and captain, the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews

“Photographer Anthony Edgeworth and writer John de St. Jorre have pulled off a great hat trick with their third and final golf book. Ireland has yet again provided wonderful writing and magnificent photographs and the authors have both done it proud.” Ian Wooldridge, golf columnist, The Daily Mail , London


Contact Edgeworth Editions by email: sales@edgewortheditions.com or Fax: 718-496-6490

 
 

 
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Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth
Written by John de St. Jorre

312 pages, 9-1/2 x 12-1/2, with over 258 full-color photographs

ISBN: 0-9658904-4

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Legendary Golf Clubs of The Ireland


 

Legendary Golf Clubs of Scotland, England, Wales and Ireland celebrates an extraordinary legacy and a living tradition, it brings the sights, sounds and smells of gentlemen's golf to life. Browsing through these pages is almost as rewarding as a visit to the clubs. This book will evoke fond memories for members and delight anyone fortunate enough to receive a copy as a gift.


Blurbs

“This is the first book to capture pictorially what British golf is all about,” 
—Michael M. Thomas, columnist, The New York Observer and Travel & Leisure Golf, and contributing editor of Golf Digest.

“… I honestly believe it's the most beautiful golf book I have ever seen.” 
—Ian Wooldridge Golf Editor Daily Mail (London)

“… a stunning book… a collectors' item if ever there was one.” Bruce Critchley , SKY TV golf commentator.

“… an amazing feel for a subject's traditions ... a stunning collection of photographs that captures the spirit of ‘gentleman's golf' in golf's birthland.” 
Golf Digest


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With Introduction by General James L. Jones, Commandant of the Marine Corps

Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth

Written by John de St. Jorre

256 pages, 9-1/2 x 12-1/2, with over 150 full-color photographs

ISBN: 0-9658902-2

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The Marines


 

Blurb

"With short essays and extraordinary pictures, this eloquently simple book gives us the beating heart of the U.S. Marine Corps, servant of our republic since the Revolution. Semper Fidelis - the marines live it every day." 
—Stephen Coonts, Author of Final Flight

The United States Marine Corps, a unique fighting force that is older than the Republic itself, symbolizes American independence and nationhood.

Photographer Anthony Edgeworth and writer John de St. Jorre examined the Marine Corps at close quarters and have produced a memorable and colorful contemporary portrait. Starting at boot camp in Parris Island, South Carolina, they visited marines wherever they happened to be.


Contact Edgeworth Editions by email: sales@edgewortheditions.com or Fax: 718-496-6490

 
 

 
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With Introduction by General James L. Jones, Commandant of the Marine Corps

Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth

Written by John de St. Jorre

150 pages with over 256 full-color photographs

ISBN: 0-9658904-0-6

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The Institute


 

In an age when many colleges seem to coddle and cater to students, VMI stands out as a historic exception. Cadets wear uniforms, march to every meal, sleep in four- and five-man rooms with plain wood furniture. A four-year college built around a tough, demanding system of military discipline, "the Institute" does little to make life easy for its charges, particularly not for first-year cadets, who are called Rats.

But in spite or perhaps because of its demanding nature, "the I" inspires an intense and protective loyalty, a sense of community and even love, that students and alumni sometimes have difficulty explaining. "You wouldn't understand unless you went there," they will often say.

Anthony Edgeworth went there. For one year, accompanied by writer Geoffrey Norman. In dramatic photos, Edgeworth records the special quality of VMI life ant the VMI spirit, while Norman's text chronicles, from the inside, a year in the life of VMI and its cadets - from the agonies of the Rats to the pageantry of full dress parades.


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With Introduction by General James L. Jones, Commandant of the Marine Corps

Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth

Written by Lisa Zeidner

Brandywine


 

Brandywine: A Legacy of Tradition in du Pont-Wyeth Country is a lavish tribute to one of America 's most extraordinary regions - and one of its best-kept secrets. Featuring over 150 stunning photographs by the acclaimed photographer Anthony Edgeworth and a lively text culled from scores of interviews with some of the area's most colorful characters.

Meandering through the rich, rolling Pennsylvania landscape made familiar the world over by three generations of Wyeths and skirting the fabulous, feudal domains of the du Pont family in Delaware , the Brandywine has become synonymous with a region steeped in history, tradition, and ... privacy.


Contact Edgeworth Editions by email: sales@edgewortheditions.com or Fax: 561.790.3085


 
 

 
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Photographed by Anthony Edgeworth

Written by John de St. Jorre

The Guards 


 

*No longer available*

Former Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, on his service in the Grenadier Guards: “It is a great thing at some time in your life to be associated with something which is quite first class.”

The Guards, a body of some six thousand officers and men whose special task it is to protect the British sovereign, are the oldest and perhaps the most unusual military institution in the West.

They are not just a tourist attraction on parade in London ; they are also a highly disciplined and versatile military formation with hallowed traditions and an enduring sense of family and service.

Through remarkable photographs and a lively narrative text, The Guards presents a comprehensive portrait of this unique military organization.


Contact Edgeworth Editions by email: sales@edgewortheditions.com or Fax: 561.790.3085